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Poem

Maung Yu Py

A UFO Sighting Yesterday at the Edge of Town

A UFO sighting yesterday at the edge of town. People are talking about it. Some don’t buy the talk. But it’s the talk of the town. People who’re talking about it grow very serious. How can you tell them “It’s impossible!”? Maybe it is possible. Some people are thinking of moving out of this little town. Some who witnessed the UFO last night pinch themselves to make sure they’re not dreaming. Some are already making banners that read “Aliens, you are most welcome!” Some are wielding their tiny cameras. Since this afternoon, some have camped on the path that circles the hill at the edge of town. As the crowd gathers, roadside stalls appear one after another. Gasmask seller, binoculars merchant, food and drink hawker, beer bar, chair and umbrella rental, a booth to watch over parked cars, etc. The edge of town is now getting festive. Some elders and some middle-aged folk who have taken refuge in the church refuse to leave. The authorities responsible for the security of the little town call an emergency meeting. Some participants lobby for a curfew imposed on the edge of town. Someone suggests the evacuation of the entire population. Another counters with “It’s not a good idea – a field should be cleared to cordially receive the aliens.” An army officer orders his troops to stand by. Some of the townsfolk get edgier and edgier. Rapture looms, there are more and more thefts, robberies and burglaries. More and more people binge-drink and rampage. In the streets, citizens from all walks of life – regardless of caste, class or noble birth – peer up cautiously at the giant sky. Car accidents, fire drills and street brawls become very unremarkable incidents. Some people just remain inside their homes and keep on doing whatever it is they are doing. For these people, “When aliens come, they come.” And there are even those who, all day, calmly chew on their own boots.

A UFO SIGHTING YESTERDAY AT THE EDGE OF TOWN

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A UFO Sighting Yesterday at the Edge of Town

A UFO sighting yesterday at the edge of town. People are talking about it. Some don’t buy the talk. But it’s the talk of the town. People who’re talking about it grow very serious. How can you tell them “It’s impossible!”? Maybe it is possible. Some people are thinking of moving out of this little town. Some who witnessed the UFO last night pinch themselves to make sure they’re not dreaming. Some are already making banners that read “Aliens, you are most welcome!” Some are wielding their tiny cameras. Since this afternoon, some have camped on the path that circles the hill at the edge of town. As the crowd gathers, roadside stalls appear one after another. Gasmask seller, binoculars merchant, food and drink hawker, beer bar, chair and umbrella rental, a booth to watch over parked cars, etc. The edge of town is now getting festive. Some elders and some middle-aged folk who have taken refuge in the church refuse to leave. The authorities responsible for the security of the little town call an emergency meeting. Some participants lobby for a curfew imposed on the edge of town. Someone suggests the evacuation of the entire population. Another counters with “It’s not a good idea – a field should be cleared to cordially receive the aliens.” An army officer orders his troops to stand by. Some of the townsfolk get edgier and edgier. Rapture looms, there are more and more thefts, robberies and burglaries. More and more people binge-drink and rampage. In the streets, citizens from all walks of life – regardless of caste, class or noble birth – peer up cautiously at the giant sky. Car accidents, fire drills and street brawls become very unremarkable incidents. Some people just remain inside their homes and keep on doing whatever it is they are doing. For these people, “When aliens come, they come.” And there are even those who, all day, calmly chew on their own boots.

A UFO Sighting Yesterday at the Edge of Town

A UFO sighting yesterday at the edge of town. People are talking about it. Some don’t buy the talk. But it’s the talk of the town. People who’re talking about it grow very serious. How can you tell them “It’s impossible!”? Maybe it is possible. Some people are thinking of moving out of this little town. Some who witnessed the UFO last night pinch themselves to make sure they’re not dreaming. Some are already making banners that read “Aliens, you are most welcome!” Some are wielding their tiny cameras. Since this afternoon, some have camped on the path that circles the hill at the edge of town. As the crowd gathers, roadside stalls appear one after another. Gasmask seller, binoculars merchant, food and drink hawker, beer bar, chair and umbrella rental, a booth to watch over parked cars, etc. The edge of town is now getting festive. Some elders and some middle-aged folk who have taken refuge in the church refuse to leave. The authorities responsible for the security of the little town call an emergency meeting. Some participants lobby for a curfew imposed on the edge of town. Someone suggests the evacuation of the entire population. Another counters with “It’s not a good idea – a field should be cleared to cordially receive the aliens.” An army officer orders his troops to stand by. Some of the townsfolk get edgier and edgier. Rapture looms, there are more and more thefts, robberies and burglaries. More and more people binge-drink and rampage. In the streets, citizens from all walks of life – regardless of caste, class or noble birth – peer up cautiously at the giant sky. Car accidents, fire drills and street brawls become very unremarkable incidents. Some people just remain inside their homes and keep on doing whatever it is they are doing. For these people, “When aliens come, they come.” And there are even those who, all day, calmly chew on their own boots.
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Stichting Van Beuningen Peterich-fonds
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Lira fonds
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